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Posts tagged ‘time’

Reblog: StevenPressfield. Henry Miller’s Eleven Personal Commandments

Writing Wednesdays: Henry Miller’s Eleven Commandments.

Henry Miller’s Eleven Commandments

By STEVEN PRESSFIELD | PublishedMAY 2, 2012

With gratitude to Maria Popova, from whose February 22 article on Brain Pickings I pilfered the following (and to George Spencer, who turned me on to the wonderful Brain Pickings), here is some priceless wisdom from one of my literary heroes, Henry Miller.

Tropic

(What I love about these notes is that they’re aimed by Miller only for himself—without a glimmer of self-consciousness, nor even for a moment intended for public dissemination. Here is a writer lashing himself to the mast, though not too tightly, as he bears down on what would become his first published novel, Tropic of Cancer.)

COMMANDMENTS

1. Work on one thing at a time until finished.

2. Start no more new books, add no new material to Black Spring.

3. Don’t be nervous. Work calmly, joyously, recklessly on whatever is in hand.

4. Work according to Program and not according to mood. Stop at the appointed time!

5. When you can’t create you can work.

6. Cement a little every day, rather than add new fertilizers.

7. Keep human! See people, go places, drink if you feel like it.

8. Don’t be a draught-horse! Work with pleasure only.

9. Discard the Program when you feel like it—but go back to it the next day.Concentrate. Narrow down. Exclude.

10. Forget the books you want to write. Think only of the book you are writing.

11. Write first and always. Painting, music, friends, cinema, all these come afterwards.

Proof Of Time Travel: Cell User Calls The Future

Earlier this month this video started circulating of a woman appearing to have been captured talking on a cell phone in 1928.  The footage came from the opening of a Charlie Caplin movie at Mann’s Chinese Theater, and it’s pretty weird.

Now, the Cristian Science Monitor has published an article saying that the cell phone claim has been debunked.  According to their experts, the woman is using 19th century era hearing device called an Ear Trumpet.

 

eTrumpet or iPhone?

 

But go back and watch the slow motion analysis again.  I’m still not so certain it’s a hearing air.  It’s reasonable to think that the woman is listening for something.  But who is she talking too?