website, blog and vanity nexus of writer R F Brown

Posts tagged ‘rock’

UNCLAIMED: Names For Bar Bands

Semi-professional musicians, if you’ve recently split from the Thursday-Sunday band you formed with some guys from the office, I’m here to get you started again. You might think the old dudes never found your “sound” but my guess is you never had the right name.

Tits ‘n’ Whiskey

E.R. Nurse

Dog Water

Lucifer’s Cock

The Telephone Bills

Sweat Band

Adam & Evil

Perry and the Winkles

Milk Dudes

Chuck Roast and his Fingerlings

Santa’s Bastards

Bass Ick

Muss+Fuss

Rock Of Lamb

A Bad-minton Racket

Chocolate Funkdae 

Dave & Buttholes

2 Balls and a Strike

Flyy and the Ointments

Gay Panic!

Automatic Tune Machine

book reports – THE THEATER WILL ROCK, Elizabeth L. Wollman

THE THEATER WILL ROCK: A HISTORY OF THE ROCK MUSICAL FROM HAIR TO HEDWIG (2006)

There does seem to be a common understanding that before the musical Hair there was nothing like Hair and that most of what followed Hair were flop imitations – Dude, Via Galactica, Rainbow. Though Hair became a classic, theatrical producers stopped throwing their money away on rock scores by about 1975. What Elizabeth Wollman’s through history brings forward is that Hair’s influence in musical theatre can be seen in decades of cultural tug-of-war between keeping rock music’s aesthetics authentic and produce musicals that have mass audience appeal. Hair’s long beautiful hair grew into Grease, and Les Mis, and Mama Mia but through the use of softer forms of rock music. We don’t really recognize how things of changed since Rogers and Hammerstein. Unlike any work I’ve read on the topic of musical theatre, or even in rock journalism for that matter, Wollman finally provides language for describing the variety of very different kinds of musical theatre that are too often lazily categorized as “rock musicals.” For once Hair is rock musical, Jesus Christ Superstar is rock opera and Dreamgirls and Smokey Joe’s Cafe are other things too, well categorized here. I have a couple of quibbles. First, I think Wollman doesn’t emphasize that much of the failure in those fabulous post-Hair rock flops lies in being rushed to Broadway with big money backers and no existing source material. Most of the truly great shows in musical theatre are drawn from novels, plays or history. At least Hair had the huge benefit of a long and sometimes painful gestation period before finally coming uptown. The big rock flops of the early 1970’s were being made-up on the spot. Ironically two of the successful rock musicals from the same period, Your Own Thing and Two Gentleman of Verona were adapted from that rebellious beatnik Shakespeare. Next, Wollman makes frequent reference to off-off Broadway shows like House of Leather and The Legend of Johnny Pot which barely ever opened, meanwhile her research overlooks shows like Promenade (259 performances) and Salvation (239 performances). Finally, between her socio-historical chapters the author includes some short academic meditations on audience attitudes, marketing experiments, and musical aesthetics. These interlude essay are well written they do seem like step children, sections from a different book. If you are seeking musical aesthetics and composition for musical theater, you won’t find much here on the specific shows or songs. However this is excellent work on cultural commodification and the economics of Broadway over the last forty years.

the dirty needle – THE LAST SWEET DAYS OF ISSAC

The Last Sweet Days of Issac is about a guy trying to make it with a girl in an elevator and then, in the second act, the same guy, in jail, trying to make it with a different girl through a television screen. I don’t think we’re in Oklahoma anymore. The play appears to be Brecht inspired and the music is the definite offspring of Hair. Issac was a decent off-Broadway hit in 1970. The show’s creators were the female-female team of Nancy Ford (composer) and Gretchen Cryer (lyrics and mother of actor John Cryer). Ford and Cryer got what ever they needed to bring another show to Broadway called Shelter. Shelter flopped, but after that they had their biggest hit I’m Getting My Act Together And Taking It Out on the Road. The songs in Issac are so much like Hair you could transfuse “I Want to Walk to San Francisco” and “Herein Lies the Seeds of Revolution” into the Hair lineup and not know they’re from different shows. That’s a compliment. I love Hair, and I love a lot of the rock ensemble pieces in Issac. This show has its pretentious clunkers, but it also seems to have its own point of view about living life to the fullest. I would love to see this show revived somewhere. 3 gramophones.

The vinyl copy I found has some distortion, especially during the louder tracks on side two. I think it’s an issue with the pressing rather than the recording. I’ve seen this soundtrack in the record swap bins a couple of times so it’s not hard to find and it should be cheap.

Re-rumoring "Paul Is Dead" Rumors

Dead, Not Dead?  A blog post from Robert Fontenot.

link: Paul is Dead — Frequently Asked Questions about the Paul McCartney death hoax.

Hall of Fame, Rock n Roll Runners-Up

The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame announced their list of nominees for this year’s inductions:

Alice Cooper

Beastie Boys

Bon Jovi
Chic
Neil Diamond
Donovan
Dr. John
J. Geils Band
LL Cool J
Darlene Love
Laura Nyro
Donna Summer
Joe Tex
Tom Waits
Chuck Willis

Some years they end up voting in 5, some years 10 or 12.  Exactly who “They” are and what is their voting process is not clear to me.  It is completely clear to me that nobody gives a crap.  The R&R Hall of Fame is counterintuitive.   It bestows elitism to something that is supposed to be counter-elite.  What ever you make of it, here are links to past inductees and a more interesting article on who hasn’t been inducted yet:

link: Rock and Roll Hall of Fame: The Outcasts.

link: http://rockhall.com/inductees/byyear/

Icarus P. Anybody: RIP SRV

Remembering blues guitarist Stevie Ray Vaughn

Icarus P. Anybody: RIP SRV.